Cervico-Ocular Reflex in Normal Subjects and Patients with Unilateral Vestibular Hypofunction

dc.contributor.authorSchubert, Michael C.
dc.contributor.authorDas, Vallabh E.
dc.contributor.authorTusa, Ronald J.
dc.contributor.authorHerdman, Susan J.
dc.date.accessioned2020-03-10T18:03:53Z
dc.date.available2020-03-10T18:03:53Z
dc.date.issued1/1/2004
dc.description.abstractObjective: To determine whether the cervico-ocular reflex contributes to gaze stability in patients with unilateral vestibular hypofunction. Study Design: Prospective study. Setting: Tertiary referral center. Patients: Patients with unilateral vestibular hypofunction (n = 3) before and after vestibular rehabilitation and healthy subjects (n = 7). Interventions: Vestibular rehabilitation. Main Outcome Measures: We measured the cervico-ocular reflex in patients with unilateral vestibular hypofunction before and after vestibular rehabilitation and in healthy subjects. To measure the cervico-ocular reflex, we recorded eye movements with a scleral search coil while the trunk moved at 0.3, 1.0, and 1.5 Hz beneath a stabilized head. To determine whether the head was truly stabilized, we measured head movement using a search coil. Results: We found no evidence of cervico-ocular reflex in any of the seven healthy subjects or in two of the patients with unilateral vestibular hypofunction. In one patient with chronic unilateral vestibular hypofunction, the cervico-ocular reflex was present before vestibular rehabilitation only for leftward trunk rotation (relative head rotation toward the intact side). After 5 weeks of placebo exercises, there was no change in the cervico-ocular reflex. After an additional 5 weeks that included vestibular exercises, cervico-ocular reflex gain for leftward trunk rotation had increased threefold. In addition, there was now evidence of a cervico-ocular reflex for rightward trunk rotation, potentially compensating for the vestibular deficit. Conclusion: The cervico-ocular reflex appears to be a highly inconsistent mechanism. The change of the cervico-ocular reflex in one patient after vestibular exercises suggests that the cervico-ocular reflex may be adaptable in some patients.
dc.identifier.citationCopyright 2004 Otology & Neurotology. Recommended citation: Schubert, Michael C., Vallabh Das, Ronald J. Tusa, and Susan J. Herdman. "Cervico-ocular reflex in normal subjects and patients with unilateral vestibular hypofunction." Otology & Neurotology 25, no. 1 (2004): 65-71. DOI: 10.1097/00129492-200401000-00013. URL: https://s3.amazonaws.com/academia.edu.documents/39844944/Cervico-ocular_reflex_in_normal_subjects20151109-11328-wb0fc7.pdf?AWSAccessKeyId=AKIAIWOWYYGZ2Y53UL3A&Expires=1539619095&Signature=v05eRBqWHK4pTvcvE6XXh45zGg8%3D&response-content-disposition=inline%3B%20filename%3DCervico-Ocular_Reflex_in_Normal_Subjects.pdf. Reproduced in accordance with the original publisher’s licensing terms and with permission from the author(s).
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10657/6003
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherOtology & Neurotology
dc.subjectCervico-ocular reflex
dc.subjectVestibular hypofunction
dc.titleCervico-Ocular Reflex in Normal Subjects and Patients with Unilateral Vestibular Hypofunction
dc.typeArticle
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