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dc.contributorKellogg, Susan
dc.contributor.authorSeiter, Timothy F.
dc.date.accessioned2018-02-27T15:56:57Z
dc.date.available2018-02-27T15:56:57Z
dc.date.issued2017
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10657/2573
dc.description.abstractConsidered the most "savage" and fearsome of all the Texan Indian tribes, the Karankawa were a group of people indigenous to the Gulf Coast of Texas who spoke the same language and shared a similar culture. The Karankawa were not a single tribe, but were a conglomeration of many. The Karankawa inhabited the land to the south of Galveston, down to the southern end of Corpus Christi Bay. As hunters and gatherers, food availability greatly affected their range. Their location, be it on the mainland or barrier islands, depended on the season.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.relation.ispartofSummer Undergraduate Research Fellowship
dc.titleThe Karankawa Indians: Fictions and Facts
dc.typePoster
dc.description.departmentHistory, Department of
dc.description.departmentHonors College


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