Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorFreiberg, H. Jerome
dc.creatorClark, Windy 1981-
dc.date.accessioned2014-07-09T15:35:36Z
dc.date.available2014-07-09T15:35:36Z
dc.date.createdMay 2012
dc.date.issued2012-05
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10657/600
dc.description.abstractStudents spend an average of 10,000 hours in classrooms by the time they reach middle school; they represent a valuable source of school climate data. Students’ perceptions of the school and classroom climate give an insider’s reflection of the actual climate that an outside observer would not capture. Rather than analyzing school and classroom climate as an aggregated totality, the purpose of this study was to disaggregate the data to examine the effects of gender, grade level, and subject area on climate perceptions at an intermediate school. The study addressed the following questions: (a) Do students’ perceptions of school and classroom climate significantly vary with gender? (b) Do students’ perceptions of school and classroom climate significantly vary with grade level? (c) Do students’ perceptions of school and classroom climate significantly vary with subject area (math, reading, and science)? Climate data from the student survey were disaggregated to evaluate the effects of multiple independent variables on multiple dependent variables using a multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA), Tests of Between-Subjects Effects, and Tukey’s HSD. The data revealed that the three independent variables (gender, grade level, and subject area) have significant effects on the five dependent variables (climate themes: Prevention, Caring, Cooperation, Organization, and Community). The Tests of Between-Subjects Effects indicated statistically significant effects for gender within the Prevention Theme; grade level within the Caring Theme; and subject area within the Prevention, Caring, and Organization Themes. This study embarks on promising research that explores school and classroom climate disaggregated by gender, grade level (fifth-sixth grade), and subject area (math, reading, and science).
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoeng
dc.rightsThe author of this work is the copyright owner. UH Libraries and the Texas Digital Library have their permission to store and provide access to this work. Further transmission, reproduction, or presentation of this work is prohibited except with permission of the author(s).
dc.subjectSchool Climate
dc.subjectClimate Survey
dc.subjectDisaggregated Data
dc.subjectFifth and Sixth Grade
dc.subjectStudents' Perceptions
dc.subjectConsistency Management and Cooperative Discipline
dc.subjectIntermediate
dc.subjectElementary
dc.subject.otherProfessional leadership
dc.titleSTUDENT PERCEPTIONS OF SCHOOL CLIMATE: DISAGGREGATED BY GENDER, GRADE LEVEL, AND SUBJECT AREA
dc.date.updated2014-07-09T15:35:36Z
dc.type.genreThesis
thesis.degree.nameDoctor of Education
thesis.degree.levelDoctoral
thesis.degree.disciplineProfessional Leadership
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Houston
thesis.degree.departmentCurriculum and Instruction, Department of
dc.contributor.committeeMemberAmine, Rayyan
dc.contributor.committeeMemberBusch, Steven D.
dc.contributor.committeeMemberEmerson, Michael W.
dc.type.dcmiText
dc.format.digitalOriginborn digital
dc.description.departmentCurriculum and Instruction, Department of
thesis.degree.collegeCollege of Education


Files in this item


Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record