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dc.contributorTamber-Rosenau, Benjamin
dc.contributor.authorKumar, Akshat
dc.date.accessioned2018-02-27T15:51:50Z
dc.date.available2018-02-27T15:51:50Z
dc.date.issued2017
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10657/2507
dc.description.abstractCognitive (cog) tasks require mental effort. Motor (mot) tasks require physical movement. Dual-task (DT) interference is the slower or less accurate performance of two tasks performed simultaneously compared to when each is performed individually. Cog-cog DT and cog-mot DT interference have both been studied individually but it is unknown if they stem from the same capacity limit in the brain. Cog-mot DT interference has been linked to increased fall risk and the development of neurological disorders.1 Linking cog-mot DT interference to cog-cog DT interference could provide new, safer methods of diagnosis/prognosis. Conclusions. Participants who had less cog-cog DT costs tended to have the most DT interference while walking. DT interference in the cog-cog domain may be predictive of DT interference in the cog-mot domain as many of the correlations trended towards significance.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.relation.ispartofSummer Undergraduate Research Fellowship
dc.titleRelationship Between Cognitive-Cognitive and Cognitive-Motor Dual-Task Interference
dc.typePoster
dc.description.departmentPsychology
dc.description.departmentHonors College


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