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dc.contributor.authorWalker, Rheeda L.
dc.contributor.authorSalami, Temilola K.
dc.contributor.authorCater, Sierra E.
dc.contributor.authorFlowers, Kelci C.
dc.date.accessioned2018-02-26T22:28:18Z
dc.date.available2018-02-26T22:28:18Z
dc.date.issued03/01/17
dc.identifier10.1080/13811118.2017.1289871
dc.identifier.citationCopyright 2017 Archives of Suicide Research. This is a post-print, peer-reviewed version of a published paper that is available at: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/13811118.2017.1289871?journalCode=usui20. Recommended citation: Walker, Rheeda L., Temilola Salami, Sierra Carter, and Kelci C. Flowers. "Religious coping style and cultural worldview are associated with suicide ideation among African American adults." Archives of suicide research (2017): 1-12. This item has been deposited in accordance with publisher copyright and licensing terms and with the author’s permission.
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10657/2357
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this study was to examine whether specific religious coping styles and cultural worldview would be associated with thoughts of suicide given higher levels of stress in a community-based sample of African American adults. African American men and women (n = 134) completed measures of religious coping, cultural worldview, stressful life events, depression symptoms, and suicide ideation. Higher ratings of suicide ideation were observed for African Americans who endorsed a more self-directing religious coping style. The self-directing religious coping was more frequently endorsed by participants who identified with a more Eurocentric cultural worldview that espouses an individualist philosophy. Together, these findings provide some insight to how religious coping and culture are related to suicide vulnerability for African Americans who are not in clinical care.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherArchives of Suicide Research
dc.subjectAfrican American
dc.subjectReligious coping
dc.subjectSuicide
dc.subjectWorldview
dc.titleReligious coping style and cultural worldview are associated with suicide ideation among African American adults
dc.typearticle


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