Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorBusch, Steven D.
dc.creatorHalbert, Thomas Timothy
dc.date.accessioned2017-03-07T03:41:10Z
dc.date.available2017-03-07T03:41:10Z
dc.date.createdDecember 2014
dc.date.issued2014-12
dc.date.submittedDecember 2014
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10657/1644
dc.description.abstractThe velocious evolution of technology has applied great pressure on educational institutions to transform curriculum delivery systems and provide innovative tools to accelerate closing the academic achievement gap (Maddux & Johnson, 2011a). Essential to understanding the critical factors that create achievement gaps is the understanding that students are different from each other. Instructional focus must shift to personalized instruction by individualizing the learning experience and tapping into the intrinsic motivation every child has to learn (C. Johnson, 2014). At the forefront of this change is technology innovation using tablet technology. Successful implementation of instructional technology has been difficult because many educational institutions are stuck in the industrial era and are reactionary in the adoption of meaningful technology (Soloway, 1993). The result is frivolous spending on fads that have negligible impact on learning (Bloom, 1981; Haswell, 1993). This study examined the effect that tablet technology has on academic engagement. In this study the impact that tablet technology has on the various phases of the lesson cycle was examined by investigating the perceptions of elementary and middles school teachers. By examining the implementation of tablet technology at the various phases of the lesson cycle, this study has identified the effects that tablet technology has on student motivation. A qualitative cross-sectional survey research design was used. The subjects were elementary and middle school teachers in a large suburban southeast Texas school district that incorporated tablet technology into the various phases of a lesson. Each of the fourteen survey questions, using Likert scale responses, yielded quantitative data and were examined using descriptive statistics, including mean, median, mode, standard deviations and frequencies. The results of this study suggest that there is a strong relationship (μ = 4.53, σ = 0.73) between Tablet Technology and academic engagement as perceived by elementary and middle school teachers. Each of the seven dimensions of the Lesson Design model supported these findings with means ranging from 3.61 to 4.25 and standard deviations ranging from 0.78 to 1.13. Teacher perceptions regarding the impact of Tablet Technology on student motivation yielded means ranging from 3.19 to 4.32 and standard deviations ranging from 0.73 to 1.25. Evaluation of these statistics strongly suggests that there is a relationship between tablet technology and student motivation.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoeng
dc.rightsThe author of this work is the copyright owner. UH Libraries and the Texas Digital Library have their permission to store and provide access to this work. Further transmission, reproduction, or presentation of this work is prohibited except with permission of the author(s).
dc.subjectAcademic Engagement
dc.subjectTablet Technology
dc.subjectElementary School
dc.subjectMiddle School
dc.subjectStudent Engagement
dc.subjectLesson Design
dc.subjectMotivational Design
dc.subjectARCS Model
dc.subjectTechnology History
dc.subjectComputer History
dc.titleTeacher Perceptions Regarding The Effect Of Tablet Technology On The Academic Engagement Of Elementary And Middle School Students
dc.date.updated2017-03-07T03:41:10Z
dc.type.genreThesis
thesis.degree.nameDoctor of Education
thesis.degree.levelDoctoral
thesis.degree.disciplineProfessional Leadership
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Houston
thesis.degree.departmentEducational Leadership and Policy Studies, Department of
dc.contributor.committeeMemberMacNeil, Angus J.
dc.contributor.committeeMemberEmerson, Michael W.
dc.contributor.committeeMemberMcGlohn, Robin
dc.contributor.committeeMemberBorneman, Robert C.
dc.type.dcmiText
dc.format.digitalOriginborn digital
dc.description.departmentEducational Leadership and Policy Studies, Department of
thesis.degree.collegeCollege of Education


Files in this item


Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record