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dc.contributor.advisorMacNeil, Angus J.
dc.creatorWhittredge, Gary
dc.date.accessioned2017-02-05T04:46:31Z
dc.date.available2017-02-05T04:46:31Z
dc.date.createdAugust 2014
dc.date.issued2014-08
dc.date.submittedAugust 2014
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10657/1612
dc.description.abstractThis case study focuses on curriculum development for creating critical skills enhancement curriculum that qualifies for the Post 9/11 Government Issued (GI) Educational Bill, as well as providing a cohort structure that helps deal with Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) and lifestyle transitional related issues. Not all returning Post 9/11 veterans are seeking a two or four year college degree in higher education. What those veterans need is a way to transition their Military Occupational Specialty (MOS) skills into jobs that are in demand within the current business environment. That transition of skills can range from basic business courses to refresher courses in math and soft computer skills. Returning veterans trying to acquire these critical skill enhancements find that these types of courses do not meet the requirements set forth by the current GI bill. The current Post 9/11 GI Bill will only pay for educational courses that leads to a two or four year degree or courses that fulfill a job license requirement. This study provides a framework for addressing this problem and makes recommendations for changes in procedures and curriculum that can be supported by the current Post 9/11 GI Bill. The results of this case study suggests that developing a condensed curriculum provides Post 9/11 veterans with the skills needed to secure gainful employment in a minimal timeframe. The condensed curriculum follows the course requirements for an undergraduate degree and thus qualifies for the Post 9/11 GI Bill Educational Benefits. The Post 9/11 GI Bill Educational Benefits provides the veteran with tuition assistance, books, housing and living allowance during their skills enhancement training. This case study also suggests that the development of a veteran’s cohort greatly reduces transition anxieties as well as the anxieties associated with PTSD and other closely associated mental disorders. The findings of this case study points to the fact that universities and colleges need to change their curriculum to address the Post 9/11 veteran’s educational needs.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoeng
dc.subjectPost 9/11 veterans
dc.subjectcurriculum
dc.titleA Case Study: Developmet of Critical Skills Curriculum For Post 9/11 Veterans Transitioning to Civilian and Higher Education Lifestyles
dc.date.updated2017-02-05T04:46:31Z
dc.type.genreThesis
thesis.degree.nameDoctor of Education
thesis.degree.levelDoctoral
thesis.degree.disciplineProfessional Leadership
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Houston
thesis.degree.departmentCurriculum and Instruction
dc.contributor.committeeMemberBusch, Steven D.
dc.contributor.committeeMemberEmerson, Michael W.
dc.contributor.committeeMemberBorneman, Robert C.
dc.contributor.committeeMemberMcGlohn, Robin
dc.type.dcmiText
dc.format.digitalOriginborn digital
dc.description.departmentCurriculum and Instruction
thesis.degree.collegeCollege of Education


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