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dc.contributor.advisorNorton, Peter J.
dc.contributor.advisorReitzel, Lorraine R.
dc.creatorSavoy, Elaine
dc.date.accessioned2016-09-03T23:34:22Z
dc.date.available2016-09-03T23:34:22Z
dc.date.createdMay 2016
dc.date.issued2016-05
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10657/1489
dc.description.abstractTobacco use, mainly cigarette smoking, is a prevalent and deadly habit, and disproportionately affects homeless individuals, who have fewer resources and increased stressors compared to domiciled smokers. Despite these disadvantages, the majority of homeless smokers report a desire to quit yet little is known about how to facilitate smoking cessation among this population. Limitations of previous work includes small samples and low quit rates – even on the quit date. The current study used ecological momentary assessments (EMAs) and focused on cigarettes smoked per day (CPD) following a specific quit attempt to more effectively study smoking cessation among this group. Using the relapse prevention model to inform the hypotheses, the current study sought to examine whether moment-to-moment changes in affect [e.g., negative affect (NA), positive affect (PA), and stress] predicted changes in CPD following a specific quit attempt among a homeless sample of smokers. Participants were 67 homeless daily smokers aged >18 from a transitional shelter program in Dallas, Texas. Separate hierarchical linear modeling (HLM) on each predictor was performed to examine the associations between affective variables and CPD in covariate-adjusted analyses. Model diagnostics were run to test whether necessary model assumptions were met, then HLM was re-run on each predictor to obtain final results. Results indicated that increases in PA during the post-quit week significantly predicted fewer CPD (p=.0025). Increases in NA during the post-quit week was marginally associated with greater CPD (p=.0548). Homeless smokers may be less likely to increase their cigarette consumption during periods of greater positive affect throughout the post-quit week. Intervention programs could utilize this information as well as recent smoking cessation literature focusing on affective variables (using domiciled smoker samples) to examine the efficacy of a harm reduction approach to eventual cessation.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoeng
dc.subjecthomeless smokers
dc.subjectaffect
dc.subjectecological momentary assessments (EMA)
dc.subjectcigarettes per day (CPD)
dc.subjectnegative affect
dc.subjectpositive affect
dc.subjectstress
dc.titleEXAMINING MOMENT TO MOMENT AFFECTIVE DETERMINANTS OF SMOKING RATE FOLLOWING A QUIT ATTEMPT IN A SAMPLE OF HOMELESS ADULT DAILY SMOKERS: AN ECOLOGICAL MOMENTARY ASSESSMENT STUDY
dc.date.updated2016-09-03T23:34:22Z
dc.type.genreThesis
thesis.degree.nameDoctor of Philosophy
thesis.degree.levelDoctoral
thesis.degree.disciplinePsychology, Clinical
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Houston
thesis.degree.departmentPsychology
dc.contributor.committeeMemberNeighbors, Clayton
dc.contributor.committeeMemberBusinelle, Michael S.
dc.type.dcmiText
dc.format.digitalOriginborn digital
dc.description.departmentPsychology
thesis.degree.collegeCollege of Liberal Arts and Social Sciences


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