The effects of reality therapy processes on locus of control and dimensions of self-concept in the school setting of Mexican-American seventh and ninth grade students

Date

1982

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Abstract

This study described the effects of Reality Therapy process and class meetings on (1) locus of control as measured by the Nowicki-Strickland Locus of Control Scale and (2) selfconcept as measured by Dimensions of Self Concept (DOSC) scale among Mexican-American seventh and ninth grade students in the school setting. The sample included seventy-four Mexican-American students, who participated in the study for eleven weeks. Teachers in the experimental group conducted class meetings twice a week, each for 45 minutes. Control group teachers conducted classroom activities in the usual didactic manner. The three research hypotheses were: (1) Experimental group participants will have significantly different posttest measures on self-concept and locus of control as compared to the control group. (2) Mexican-American girls will have significantly different scores on posttest measures on selfconcept and locus of control as compared to Mexican- American boys following treatment. (5) Seventh grade participants will have significantly different scores on posttest measures on self-concept and locus of control as compared to ninth grade participants following treatment. MANOVA results on posttest dependent measures revealed a significant difference between experimental and control group following treatment. Post hoc univariate F and discriminant analysis revealed only three DOSC measures as valid discriminators: Leadership and Initiative, Academic Interest and Satisfaction, and Anxiety. Hypothesis One was partially supported. Discriminant analysis results revealed that posttest dependent measures of Mexican-American boys were significantly different from Mexican-American girls. Only one DOSC measure, Identification vs. Alienation, proved to be a valid discriminator between boys and girls. Boys scored higher on the DOSC measures and were more "internal" on locus of control than girls. Hypothesis Two was partially supported. Discrim- imant analysis results revealed no significant differences between seventh grade participants and ninth grade participants following treatment. Hypothesis Three was not supported. Results of the study suggest that the Reality Therapy process and the class meeting may be one approach to improving the self-concepts of Mexican-American adolescents of the Southwest.

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Keywords

Mexican American children, Child psychology

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