Transfer of editing skills between two microcomputer-based word processors

dc.contributor.advisorBright, George W.
dc.contributor.committeeMemberHamilton, Richard J.
dc.contributor.committeeMemberJohnson, Richard R.
dc.contributor.committeeMemberWaxman, Hersholt C.
dc.creatorTaylor, Charles David, 1946-
dc.date.accessioned2023-10-17T18:47:18Z
dc.date.available2023-10-17T18:47:18Z
dc.date.copyright1989-11-15
dc.date.issued1988
dc.description.abstractAcquisition of computer-related skills has become crucial for success in school, the workplace and society at large. Unlike subjects such as mathematics, computer skills change frequently as new technology is developed. It is important, then, to understand the influence that previously-learned knowledge and skills have upon learning new knowledge and skills — an effect called transfer of learning. Research on transfer has concentrated on specific transfer effects in behaviorally-oriented verbal learning experiments. Recently, however, cognitive psychologists have developed theories that describe transfer in terms of internal cognitive structures and that attempt to explain general or far transfer effects. Based on these theories, it was hypothesized that certain computing environments are more likely than others to foster transfer of computer-related skills. In particular, the Macintosh, utilizing "intuitive" interface devices such as pictorial icons and mouse-controlled selection of commands, should foster transfer to a more "opaque" computing environment that required recall and keying of language-oriented commands. Each of 81 undergraduate students with minimal computer experience was randomly assigned to one of two experiments. In Experiment 1, the treatment group learned editing skills on Macintosh MacWrite. The control group performed a neutral task on the Macintosh. After 48 hours, both groups learned editing skills on Wordstar for the IBM PC/AT, and then used Wordstar to perform a "real world" editing (far transfer) task. In Experiment 2, the sequence of word processors was reversed; the treatment group learned Wordstar editing skills first, then both groups learned MacWrite and performed the novel editing task on MacWrite. [...]
dc.description.departmentEducation, College of
dc.format.digitalOriginreformatted digital
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.identifier.other20479486
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10657/15325
dc.language.isoen
dc.rightsThis item is protected by copyright but is made available here under a claim of fair use (17 U.S.C. Section 107) for non-profit research and educational purposes. Users of this work assume the responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing, or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires express permission of the copyright holder.
dc.subjectWord processing--Study and teaching
dc.subjectTransfer of training
dc.titleTransfer of editing skills between two microcomputer-based word processors
dc.type.dcmiText
dc.type.genreThesis
dcterms.accessRightsThe full text of this item is not available at this time because it contains documents that are presumed to be under copyright and are accessible only to users who have an active CougarNet ID. This item will continue to be made available through interlibrary loan.
thesis.degree.collegeCollege of Education
thesis.degree.departmentEducation, College of
thesis.degree.disciplineEducation
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Houston
thesis.degree.levelDoctoral
thesis.degree.nameDoctor of Education

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