A LISP implementation of logic programming

Date

1985

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Abstract

Log-Lisp, as well as Prolog, is a deductive programming language based on the LUSH resolution of Horn clauses. Log-Lisp is an attempt to create within Lisp an implementation of Kowalski's original logic programming idea without such non-logical additions as the cut symbol. Log-Lisp does not require a preferred ordering of assertions nor of the atomic sentences within assertions. The logic programmer need not depend on the system builder to build in all primitive functions and predicates; he/she is allowed to write his/her own functions in Lisp which are invoked from Logic. The use of breadth-first search in Log-Lisp (as the default), as oppossed to the depth-first search of Prolog, eliminates the possibility of infinite search during the attempted proof of a theorem and allows for the possible extension of Log-Lisp to use heuristic search and multi-processing.

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Keywords

LISP (Computer program language)

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