Sparrows, insects, and eggs: Rumer Godden's fictional children

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1966

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By using children in her novels, Rumer Godden achieves simplicity of plot and clarity of vision. As narrators, children combine the objectivity of distance with the curiosity of involvement. Because the child sees the world from a different perspective, his point of view throws heavy responsibility and solid significance on the role of the adult. The child grows with contact with other people and with confrontation with facts of the universe. His response to both is direct and uninhibited. The children in these novels emerge as individuals. They express in simplest terms the beauty, the mystery, the sorrow, and the hope of life itself.

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