Characterization of the total and viable bacterial and fungal communities associated with the International Space Station surfaces

Abstract

The International Space Station (ISS) is a closed system inhabited by microorganisms originating from life support systems, cargo, and crew that are exposed to unique selective pressures such as microgravity. To date, mandatory microbial monitoring and observational studies of spacecraft and space stations have been conducted by traditional culture methods, although it is known that many microbes cannot be cultured with standard techniques. To fully appreciate the true number and diversity of microbes that survive in the ISS, molecular and culture-based methods were used to assess microbial communities on ISS surfaces. Samples were taken at eight pre-defined locations during three flight missions spanning 14 months and analyzed upon return to Earth.

Description

Keywords

International Space Station, Microbiome, 16S rRNA, ITS, Environmental surface, Built microbiome, Propidium monoazide, Microbial diversity

Citation

Copyright 2019 Microbiome. Recommended citation: Sielaff, Aleksandra Checinska, Camilla Urbaniak, Ganesh Babu Malli Mohan, Victor G. Stepanov, Quyen Tran, Jason M. Wood, Jeremiah Minich et al. "Characterization of the total and viable bacterial and fungal communities associated with the International Space Station surfaces." Microbiome 7, no. 1 (2019): 50. DOI: 10.1186/s40168-019-0666-x. URL: https://microbiomejournal.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s40168-019-0666-x. Reproduced in accordance with the original publisher's licensing terms and with permission from the author(s).