The effect of different modes of feedback delivery on student achievement and attitudes

Date

1978

Journal Title

Journal ISSN

Volume Title

Publisher

Abstract

This study had two major purposes. First, to determine the extent to which different forms of feedback presentation differ in their effectiveness in increasing student achievement. Second, to determine the extent to which different forms of feedback presentation differ in their impact on student attitudes. In relation to each of these tasks, three hypotheses were formulated which allowed for an examination of the extent to which, (a) verbal feedback was more effective than written feedback, (b) individual feedback was more effective than group feedback, and, (c) there was an interaction between the two factors, verbal-written feedback and individual-group feedback. The hypotheses were based on the apparent importance of feedback as an instructional device (Kulhavy, 1977; and Bloom, 1976) and the need to determine the most effective forms of feedback delivery. Support for the hypotheses was derived from a comprehensive review of the feedback literature, especially the work of Page (1958), Sweet (1966), Schoen and Kreye (1974) and Witkin (1976). [...]

Description

Keywords

Citation