A study of baccalaureate nurse educators, recent baccalaureate nurse graduates, and recent associate degree nursing graduates regarding their attitudes toward contemporary social issues and their identification with those social issues

Date

1984

Journal Title

Journal ISSN

Volume Title

Publisher

Abstract

Nursing, a predominately female profession, has been troubled by numerous unresolved conflicts resulting in increased nurse dissatisfaction. The conflicts can be traced to different levels of preparation, bureaucratic-professional dissonance, and a heightened female awareness of and increased resistance to long established unequal sex-roles within society and health care. Nursing literature demonstrates a growing number of position papers regarding changes in traditional roles, an increased resistance to sexism, and greater identification with contemporary social issues. This study was derived from the need to better understand the degree to which nurses have identified with contemporary social issues. Although numerous authors have documented issues relating to this problem, there is a lack of research in this area. The primary purpose of this study was to determine the degree to which three nursing groups, baccalaureate nurse educators, recent baccalaureate nurse graduates, and recent associate degree graduates identified with contemporary social issues, and if significant differences existed between the attitude of those in the three groups. Other purposes of the study were to determine if significant differences existed between identification with contemporary social issues in relation to marital status, age, and ethnic background. [...]

Description

Keywords

Nurses--Psychology, Nurses--United States

Citation