Crime victims, non-victims and television use : viewing patterns, perceived realism of content, and fear of victimization

dc.contributor.advisorRyan, Michael
dc.contributor.committeeMemberHeath, Robert L.
dc.contributor.committeeMemberDouglas, William
dc.contributor.committeeMemberEvans, Richard I.
dc.creatorApel, Lisa
dc.date.accessioned2023-02-21T22:29:39Z
dc.date.available2023-02-21T22:29:39Z
dc.date.copyright1989-09-13
dc.date.issued1988
dc.description.abstractThis study examines the differences between crime victims (victims of assault, robbery, and abduction) and non-victims in three areas: (1) consumption of local television news programs and network crime/law enforcement drama, (2) perceived realism of televised crime drama, and (3) fear of victimization. Personal interviews were conducted with 40 victims and 40 non-victims, all of whom resided in the same low-crime community in Houston, TX, during the last four months of 1987. The groups contained equal numbers of men and women. Data analyses indicate no significant differences between victims and non-victims in either the proportions of local news or the proportions of network crime drama viewed. Nor do analyses show significant differences between victims and non-victims in perceived realism of televised crime/law enforcement drama content. Analysis does show a weak, positive correlation between television consumption and fear of victimization; however, victims and non-victims do not differ significantly. No significant gender differences are found in either consumption of news and crime drama or in perceived realism of crime drama. Gender or victimization experience appear to have no significant effect on the amount of television watched; however, gender alone appears to have a significant effect on fear of victimization (p <.001), as does victimization experience (p <.001). Men exhibit the strongest correlation between television consumption and fear of victimization (r = .41). Analysis shows a weak negative correlation between television consumption and perceived realism of crime program content.
dc.description.departmentCommunication, Jack J. Valenti School of
dc.format.digitalOriginreformatted digital
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.identifier.other19016109
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10657/13850
dc.language.isoen
dc.rightsThis item is protected by copyright but is made available here under a claim of fair use (17 U.S.C. Section 107) for non-profit research and educational purposes. Users of this work assume the responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing, or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires express permission of the copyright holder.
dc.subjectTelevision viewers
dc.subjectVictims of crimes
dc.subjectPsychology
dc.titleCrime victims, non-victims and television use : viewing patterns, perceived realism of content, and fear of victimization
dc.type.dcmiText
dc.type.genreThesis
dcterms.accessRightsThe full text of this item is not available at this time because it contains documents that are presumed to be under copyright and are accessible only to users who have an active CougarNet ID. This item will continue to be made available through interlibrary loan.
thesis.degree.collegeCollege of Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
thesis.degree.departmentCommunication, School of
thesis.degree.disciplineCommunication
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Houston
thesis.degree.levelMasters
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Arts

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