MENTORING NOVICE TEACHERS: A CASE STUDY ON MENTORING ALTERNATIVELY CERTIFIED TEACHERS IN AN URBAN SETTING

Date

2016-12

Journal Title

Journal ISSN

Volume Title

Publisher

Abstract

While a plethora of research exists devoted to the topic of mentoring, especially related to improving teacher retention, there is a dearth of research in the understanding of the mentoring relationship as it pertains to the overall socialization process and impacts novice teachers who have come to the profession via an alternative certification route. Often overlooked in their unique needs as they step into teaching for the first time because of their training with organizations such as Teach for America, alternatively certified teachers have become an essential part of the teacher workforce. With most alternatively certified teachers forgoing the student teaching experience and being immediately thrust onto the teaching stage, the alternatively certified novice teacher should not be dismissed in terms of needing transitional support such as mentoring. The research questions addressed in this study are as follows:

  1. How are alternatively certified novice teachers in an urban setting supported in their transition to teaching through the use of mentoring?

  2. How does mentoring assist the novice teacher in their transition into their new community of practice?

  3. What impact, if any, does mentoring have on the formation of a professional teacher identity and retention?

Description

Keywords

Mentorship, Alternatively Certified Teachers, Urban

Citation