A study of the relationships between the organizational climate, the pupil control ideology and the self-esteem and power dimensions of the students' self-concept in selected elementary schools in the Corpus Christi Independent School District

Date

1973

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Abstract

The problem of the study was to determine the relationships between the organizational climate and pupil control ideology as perceived by teachers, and the self-esteem and power dimensions of the students' self concept as perceived by the students. More specifically the study examined and tested the following hypothesis: 1. Teachers who perceived their schools to have open climates will be more humanistic in their pupil control ideology. 2. The more open the organizational climate the higher the pupil self-esteem. 3. The more open the organizational climate the greater the students' sense of power. 4. The more humanistic the pupil control ideology the higher the pupil self-esteem. 5. The more humanistic the pupil control ideology the greater the students' sense of power. The study involved a sample of 29 teachers and 779 students. The teachers and students came from the fourth and sixth grades of six elementary schools in the Corpus Christi Independent School District. In the Spring of 1973 the teachers were asked to respond to the Organizational Climate Description Questionnaire and the Pupil Control Ideology Questionnaire. These two sets of data were then correlated with the self-esteem and power scores obtained from the Children's Self-Social Constructs Test that the students responded to in the Spring of 1973. In addition eight teachers were randomly selected from the sample in order that observations of their verbal interaction with students could be made by the use of the Flanders Verbal Interaction System. This dimension was included in the design in an effort to check the face validity of the OCDQ and PCI scores of the eight teachers. [...]

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Keywords

School management and organization, Self-perception

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