The Effects of Cognitive and Affective Empathy Deficits on Intimate Partner Violence Perpetrators

dc.contributor.advisorBabcock, Julia C.
dc.contributor.committeeMemberVincent, John P.
dc.contributor.committeeMemberSchwartz, Jonathan P.
dc.creatorArmenti, Nicholas A.
dc.date.accessioned2016-09-03T22:14:10Z
dc.date.available2016-09-03T22:14:10Z
dc.date.createdMay 2016
dc.date.issued2016-05
dc.date.updated2016-09-03T22:14:10Z
dc.description.abstractThis study attempted to extend findings on both borderline personality and Factor 1 psychopathy and intimate partner violence (IPV). Theory and research suggest that borderline personality is marked by psychophysiological hyperreactivity whereas psychopathy is related to psychophysiological hyporeactivity. As such, this study also sought to identify psychophysiological hyperreactivity in individuals with borderline personality and psychophysiological hyporeactivity in individuals with Factor 1 psychopathy. Cognitive and affective empathy were presented in order to observe how associated deficits influence how men with borderline personality or Factor 1 psychopathy experience psychophysiological reactivity and perpetrate IPV. Borderline personality was positively related to IPV, whereas Factor 1 psychopathy was not. Neither borderline personality nor Factor 1 psychopathy was directly related to psychophysiological reactivity. However, multiple regressions revealed that cognitive empathy moderated the relation between borderline personality and psychophysiological reactivity. Individuals high in cognitive empathy showed a positive relation between borderline personality and psychophysiological reactivity and individuals low in cognitive empathy showed a negative relation. Affective empathy moderated the relation between Factor 1 psychopathy and psychophysiological reactivity. When Factor 1 psychopathy was low, individuals showed psychophysiological hyperreactivity if affective empathy was high but hyporeactivity if affective empathy was low. This dichotomy diminished when Factor 1 psychopathy was high. Empathy did not moderate relations involving IPV. Clinically, understanding empathy deficits is needed to integrate tools for resolving conflict, coping with heightened arousal, and decreasing violence.
dc.description.departmentPsychology, Department of
dc.format.digitalOriginborn digital
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10657/1476
dc.language.isoeng
dc.rightsThe author of this work is the copyright owner. UH Libraries and the Texas Digital Library have their permission to store and provide access to this work. Further transmission, reproduction, or presentation of this work is prohibited except with permission of the author(s).
dc.subjectIntimate partner violence
dc.subjectBorderline Personality Disorder
dc.subjectFactor 1 psychopathy
dc.subjectEmpathy
dc.titleThe Effects of Cognitive and Affective Empathy Deficits on Intimate Partner Violence Perpetrators
dc.type.dcmiText
dc.type.genreThesis
thesis.degree.collegeCollege of Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
thesis.degree.departmentPsychology, Department of
thesis.degree.disciplinePsychology, Clinical
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Houston
thesis.degree.levelMasters
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Arts

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