Interaction analysis and cognitive levels of behavior in classes of first-year teachers who were undergraduate interns as compared with classes instructed by first-year teachers who were student teachers

dc.contributor.advisorAustin, Addie E.
dc.contributor.committeeMemberBeaty, Harper F.
dc.contributor.committeeMemberCox, John A.
dc.contributor.committeeMemberHollis, Loye Y.
dc.contributor.committeeMemberWilliams, Robert E.
dc.creatorJoseph, Dennis George
dc.date.accessioned2022-06-20T21:22:16Z
dc.date.available2022-06-20T21:22:16Z
dc.date.copyright1974
dc.date.issued1974
dc.description.abstractThe primary purpose of this research was to determine whether differences in interaction analysis patterns and questioning skills existed between first-year teachers who were undergraduate interns and first-year teachers who were student teachers. A secondary purpose of the study was to determine the relationship between the interaction analysis pattern of a teacher and the level of a teacher's questions. Literature relating to the relationship between interaction analysis and student achievement, between teachers' questioning skills and student achievement, and methods of changing the interaction analysis patterns and questioning skills of a teacher were reviewed and reported. The participants in this study graduated from the University of Houston in May 1972 and completed the same teacher education program up to the final clinical experience phase. At that point of divergence, thirteen participants completed the teacher-intern program and eight participants completed the student teaching program. The sample members were paired according to their mode of clinical experience, with additional pairing done according to instructional level and geographic location of their assigned classes. Data for this study were obtained during the participants first year of teaching. During that first year, audio recordings were made of the participants teaching lessons in mathematics and reading. Two sets of tapes were obtained. The first set of tapes was recorded during the participants first semester of teaching; the second set of tapes was recorded during the participants second semester of teaching. Each tape was analyzed using two instruments: The Flander's System of Interaction Analysis and the Sander's Question-Asking Analysis System. Thus, two ratios: the I/D ratio (the teacher's attempts at indirect influence in relation to his attempts at direct influence), and the M/TQ ratio (the number of memory questions asked by a teacher compared to the total number of questions asked by a teacher) were obtained from each tape. The ratios were submitted to correlation and multiple regression analysis comparisons. Correlation coefficients and F-ratios served as the bases for accepting or rejecting the null hypotheses. The results of the data, analyzed at the 0.05 level of confidence, indicated that: 1. After the first semester of teaching, there was no significant difference between the interaction analysis patterns of former interns and former student teachers. 2. After the first semester of teaching, there was no significant difference between the question-asking skills of former interns and former student teachers. 3. During the first year of teaching, there was no significant change in the interaction analysis patterns of question-asking skills of former interns or former student teachers. 4. No significant correlation existed between interaction analysis patterns and question-asking skills. The data from this study supported the conclusion that the difference in the two modes of clinical experience, time of supervised classroom experience, was not a critical factor in bringing about a significant change in either the interaction analysis patterns or in the question-asking skills of former interns or former student teachers. The data also supported the conclusion that the cognitive level of a teacher's questions did not affect the interaction analysis patterns employed by a teacher. Recommendations were made that (a) continuous, systematic feedback, using the two observation instruments employed in this study, be added to the intern and student teacher programs to assist the student teachers and/or interns and their supervisors with greater insight into the teaching techniques being employed in the classroom; (b) teaching competencies in addition to interaction analysis and question-asking skills, be added for the evaluation of the intern and student teaching programs; (c) only a short period of time, approximately ten to fifteen minutes, is all that is required for a classroom observer to determine the interaction analysis pattern of a teacher; and (d) a classroom supervisor analyze the entire teaching lesson to evaluate the question-asking skills of a teacher.
dc.description.departmentEducation, College of
dc.format.digitalOriginreformatted digital
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.identifier.other2088176
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10657/9525
dc.language.isoen
dc.rightsThis item is protected by copyright but is made available here under a claim of fair use (17 U.S.C. Section 107) for non-profit research and educational purposes. Users of this work assume the responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing, or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires express permission of the copyright holder.
dc.titleInteraction analysis and cognitive levels of behavior in classes of first-year teachers who were undergraduate interns as compared with classes instructed by first-year teachers who were student teachers
dc.type.dcmiText
dc.type.genreThesis
dcterms.accessRightsThe full text of this item is not available at this time because it contains documents that are presumed to be under copyright and are accessible only to users who have an active CougarNet ID. This item will continue to be made available through interlibrary loan.
thesis.degree.collegeCollege of Education
thesis.degree.departmentEducation, College of
thesis.degree.disciplineEducation
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Houston
thesis.degree.levelDoctoral
thesis.degree.nameDoctor of Education

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