Sense of competence in the spinal cord injured

dc.contributor.advisorVineberg, Shalom E.
dc.contributor.committeeMemberJohnson, Dale L.
dc.contributor.committeeMemberNett, Roger W.
dc.contributor.committeeMemberDokecki, Paul R.
dc.creatorMeyerson, Henry 1938-
dc.date.accessioned2022-07-01T17:05:35Z
dc.date.available2022-07-01T17:05:35Z
dc.date.copyright1968
dc.date.issued1968
dc.description.abstractThe present study is concerned with the relationship between physical disability and sense of competence. It is assumed that locus of control is an adequate measure of sense of competence. On this basis several specific questions were asked: 1) Is degree of physical disability systematically related to sense of competence? 2) Are locus of control scores of disabled persons different from those of normals, i.e., does disability, per se, affect sense of competence? 3) Is there a relationship between the impact of the disability, in terms of problem areas in the life of the disabled individual, and sense of competence? 4) Are any demographic characteristics of spinal cord injured persons related to their sense of competence? Forty-five male subjects who had sustained spinal cord injury resulting in partial or complete paralysis of lower or upper and lower limbs were tested to investigate these questions. The instruments employed in this investigation were: (1) Internal versus External Locus of Control Scale, (2) Handicap Problems Inventory, and (3) Activities of Daily Living Scale. It was found that: 1) Physical disability does not seem to affect sense of competence as measured by the Internal vs. External Locus of Control Scale. 2) There is no relationship between degree of disability and sense of competence as measured by the Internal vs. External Locus of Control Scale. 3) There is no relationship between the reported problems created by the disability as determined by the Handicap Problems Inventory and sense of competence as measured by the Internal vs. External Locus of Control Scale. 4) Race is the only demographic variable which significantly aided in the predicting of one's sense of competence. Negroes demonstrated a more external locus of control than did whites. 5) Employment or unemployment has no effect on sense of competence as measured by the Internal vs. External Locus of Control Scale. It is concluded that the relationship between sense of competence, actual physical competence, and the reported problems created by disability is not a simple one. The problem remains of examining other approaches to the investigation of sense of competence.
dc.description.departmentPsychology, Department of
dc.format.digitalOriginreformatted digital
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.identifier.other12204746
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10657/10316
dc.language.isoen
dc.rightsThis item is protected by copyright but is made available here under a claim of fair use (17 U.S.C. Section 107) for non-profit research and educational purposes. Users of this work assume the responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing, or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires express permission of the copyright holder.
dc.subjectSpinal cord--Wounds and injuries
dc.subjectPerformance
dc.titleSense of competence in the spinal cord injured
dc.type.dcmiText
dc.type.genreThesis
dcterms.accessRightsThe full text of this item is not available at this time because it contains documents that are presumed to be under copyright and are accessible only to users who have an active CougarNet ID. This item will continue to be made available through interlibrary loan.
thesis.degree.departmentPsychology, Department of
thesis.degree.disciplinePsychology
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Houston
thesis.degree.levelDoctoral
thesis.degree.nameDoctor of Philosophy

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