A study of needs and presentation preferences for possible inservice education programs as expressed by secondary English teachers and as perceived by secondary administrators in Texas

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1975

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This study had two primary purposes and one secondary purpose related to needs and preferences for possible inservice education presentations for secondary English teachers. The survey was conducted in twenty-six randomly selected public school systems in Texas ranging in gross Average Daily Attendance from 676 to 64,206 scholastics as reported in the Public School Directory: Bulletin 738 published by the Texas Education Agency in Austin, Texas in 1973. The subjects included 222 secondary teachers of English and seventy-three administrators. Each of the subjects received the same questionnaire, and the responses were reported by grade level and administrative level, as well as by subgroups composed of middle school or junior high school secondary English teachers, senior high school English teachers, and secondary administrators. The findings were reported in textual and tabular form. The data revealed frequencies and percentages of responses to each item concerning inservice education programs. The primary conclusions drawn from the findings within the limitations of the framework of the study revealed the following information. 1. The majority of secondary English teachers do have needs for specific inservice education programs in content areas, and the majority of English teachers are willing to express their needs when given the opportunity. Furthermore, the data revealed in this study suggested that the secondary administrators do have a perceptive awareness of the needs for inservice education programs which were expressed by the secondary English teachers. 2. The majority of secondary English teachers reported the same items as being among highest priority of need when asked to identify the five areas of most need. The secondary administrators responded with the same perceived needs in the five items of priority, although, none of the groups agreed on the order of priority ranking. A secondary conclusion drawn from the findings reported within the limitations of the study revealed the following information. The majority of secondary English teachers did have and secondary administrators did perceive a preferential or a nonpreferential reaction to fourteen possible inservice education presentations which involved a variety of modes, groupings, personnel, scheduling, methods, and topics. The secondary administrators' perceptions of expected reactions were in relatively close agreement with the reactions reported by the secondary English teachers. Based upon the findings of the study and within the limitations of the framework of the study, recommendations were made for planning inservice education programs for middle school or junior high school English teachers and senior high school English teachers in specific content areas. Based upon the findings of the study and within the stated limitations, the following recommendations for further study were delineated: 1. A similar study should be replicated over a wider geographical area to determine if the inservice education needs of secondary English teachers in Texas are similar to or different from secondary English teachers in the southwest region or in the nation. 2. The study should be conducted using elementary teachers and administrators as subjects to ascertain the teachers' needs and preferences for possible inservice presentations. 3. Research studies should be conducted to determine whether or not secondary teachers in other academic areas are as indifferent toward research activities and evaluation techniques as the secondary English teachers appeared to be. 4. Research should be conducted on the attitudes of secondary English teachers toward change particularly in the areas of the uses of technological devices, of the concept of use of the library as a learning resource center, and of the competencies needed by all secondary English teachers. 5. Research should be conducted to determine whether groups of secondary teachers in other academic areas exhibit a lack of interest toward inservice education programs on generic teaching competencies needed by all secondary teachers. 6. Further studies should be conducted to determine if secondary administrators are as perceptive to the inservice education needs, priorities of need, and possible presentation preferences of teachers in other academic areas as they appeared to be of those items of need and preferences reported by the secondary English teachers in Texas. 7. Research should be conducted to isolate which factors of the possible presentations of inservice education programs for secondary English teachers influenced the positive or negative preferential responses of the secondary English teachers in Texas.

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