Differences in Judgments of Creativity: How Do Academic Domain, Personality, and Self-Reported Creativity Influence Novice Judges’ Evaluations of Creative Productions?

dc.contributor.authorTan, Mei
dc.contributor.authorMourgues, Catalina V.
dc.contributor.authorHein, Sascha D.
dc.contributor.authorMacCormick, John
dc.contributor.authorBarbot, Baptiste
dc.contributor.authorGrigorenko, Elena L.
dc.date.accessioned2019-12-02T18:44:39Z
dc.date.available2019-12-02T18:44:39Z
dc.date.issued9/14/2015
dc.description.abstractIntelligence assessment is often viewed as a narrow and ever-narrowing field, defined (as per IQ) by the measurement of finely distinguished cognitive processes. It is instructive, however, to remember that other, broader conceptions of intelligence exist and might usefully be considered for a comprehensive assessment of intellectual functioning. This article invokes a more holistic, systems theory of intelligence—the theory of successful intelligence—and examines the possibility of including in intelligence assessment a similarly holistic measure of creativity. The time and costs of production-based assessments of creativity are generally considered prohibitive. Such barriers may be mitigated by applying the consensual assessment technique using novice raters. To investigate further this possibility, we explored the question: how much do demographic factors such as age and gender and psychological factors such as domain-specific expertise, personality or self-perceived creativity affect novices’ unidimensional ratings of creativity? Fifty-one novice judges from three undergraduate programs, majoring in three disparate expertise domains (i.e., visual art, psychology and computer science) rated 40 child-generated Lego creatures for creativity. Results showed no differences in creativity ratings based on the expertise domains of the judges. However, judges’ personality and self-perception of their own everyday creativity appeared to influence the way they scored the creatures for creativity.
dc.identifier10.3390/jintelligence3030073
dc.identifier.citationCopyright 2015 Journal of Intelligence. Recommended citation: Tan, Mei, Catalina Mourgues, Sascha Hein, John MacCormick, Baptiste Barbot, and Elena Grigorenko. "Differences in Judgments of Creativity: How Do Academic Domain, Personality, and Self-Reported Creativity Influence Novice Judges’ Evaluations of Creative Productions?." Journal of Intelligence 3, no. 3 (2015): 73-90. doi: 10.3390/jintelligence3030073. URL: https://www.mdpi.com/2079-3200/3/3/73. Reproduced in accordance with the original publisher's licensing terms and with permission from the authors.
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10657/5503
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherJournal of Intelligence
dc.subjectCreativity
dc.subjectConsensual assessment technique
dc.subjectNovice judges
dc.titleDifferences in Judgments of Creativity: How Do Academic Domain, Personality, and Self-Reported Creativity Influence Novice Judges’ Evaluations of Creative Productions?
dc.typeArticle

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