Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorBorneman, Robert C.
dc.contributor.advisorMacNeil, Angus J.
dc.creatorMensah, Kwabena Boateng
dc.date.accessioned2015-06-15T14:07:52Z
dc.date.available2015-06-15T14:07:52Z
dc.date.createdMay 2013
dc.date.issued2013-05
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10657/934
dc.description.abstractOur current school system is under much scrutiny as academic standards are steadily rising and student achievement is unable to keep pace with the rapid increases. At the core, economically disadvantaged students are achieving at lower levels than their counterparts and school leaders are left searching for answers. The purpose of this study was to determine if self-efficacy in economically disadvantaged students has a positive effect on student achievement. Research has been compiled that examines factors that influence student achievement, but studies focused on the self-efficacy of economically disadvantaged students are limited. This mixed-methods study intended to provide information that will be useful for all stakeholders that contribute to the success of economically disadvantaged students. This study revealed a significant difference in the performance of high self-efficacy economically disadvantaged students and low self-efficacy economically disadvantaged students on the 4th grade reading STAAR examination. High self-efficacy economically disadvantaged students consistently outperformed low self-efficacy counterparts. Additionally, responses from a focus group interview pointed to key areas that educators can address when developing self-efficacy in economically disadvantaged students and adults. This information can be utilized to guide conversations with students, develop the skills of teachers and parents, and adjust the perceptions of economically disadvantaged students in our schools.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoeng
dc.rightsThe author of this work is the copyright owner. UH Libraries and the Texas Digital Library have their permission to store and provide access to this work. Further transmission, reproduction, or presentation of this work is prohibited except with permission of the author(s).
dc.subjectSelf-efficacy
dc.subjectEconomically disadvantaged students
dc.subjectStudent achievement
dc.subject.otherProfessional leadership
dc.titleTHE RELATIONSHIP OF SELF-EFFICACY AND STUDENT ACHIEVEMENT ON ECONOMICALLY DISADVANTAGED STUDENTS:IMPLICATIONS FOR SCHOOL LEADERS
dc.date.updated2015-06-15T14:07:53Z
dc.type.genreThesis
thesis.degree.nameDoctor of Education
thesis.degree.levelDoctoral
thesis.degree.disciplineProfessional Leadership
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Houston
thesis.degree.departmentEducational Leadership and Cultural Studies, Department of
dc.contributor.committeeMemberBusch, Steven D.
dc.contributor.committeeMemberFernandez, Julie
dc.contributor.committeeMemberEmerson, Michael W.
dc.contributor.committeeMemberHernandez-Owolabi, Berky
dc.type.dcmiText
dc.format.digitalOriginborn digital
dc.description.departmentEducational Leadership and Cultural Studies, Department of
thesis.degree.collegeCollege of Education


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record