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dc.contributor.advisorBannova, Olga
dc.creatorGonzalez Marquez, Paola Michelle
dc.date.accessioned2020-06-04T00:28:49Z
dc.date.createdMay 2020
dc.date.issued2020-05
dc.date.submittedMay 2020
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10657/6673
dc.description.abstractAs space exploration efforts advance towards returning to the Lunar surface and later to Mars, new challenges emerge, and habitation becomes one of them. Having a custom manufacturing line for deep space transit and surface habitats (the Moon or Mars) implies a longer design and production line. Instead of spending great amounts of money and time on custom designs, why not explore a common development where the interior architectural functions can be multifunctional, capable of being adapted into distinct gravity conditions? As a matter of mitigating this challenge the viability of habitat functions, being capable of commonality between partial gravity and microgravity, is investigated. The viability is verified through human factors assessments based on the chosen design criteria: human body orientation, human anthropometrics, and the geometry and volume required within the living space. A common habitat design from the Advanced Concepts Office (ACO) at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) has been taken as the case-study for commonality refinement. The design refinement has been done based on the design tool created grounded on the design criteria: a catalogue of design requirements for partial gravity and microgravity. The case-study habitat is designed in a safe haven configuration, meaning that the habitat is composed of two pressurized node modules (herein after referred to as nodes) and if one of them were to fail and lose pressure the crew would be able to survive in the remaining node. Furthermore, the case-study habitat is capable of being adapted to two different layout configurations: (#1) a habitat that could be used both as a deep space transport (DST) in microgravity and as a surface partial gravity hab; and (#2) a habitat that could be used both as a DST in artificial gravity and as a surface partial gravity habitat. For the purpose of this investigation only layout configuration #1 has been chosen.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen
dc.rightsThe author of this work is the copyright owner. UH Libraries and the Texas Digital Library have their permission to store and provide access to this work. Further transmission, reproduction, or presentation of this work is prohibited except with permission of the author(s).
dc.subjecthuman factors
dc.subjectcommon
dc.subjectcommonality
dc.subjecthabitat
dc.subjecthabitation
dc.subjectarchitecture
dc.subjectdesign
dc.subjectdesigner
dc.subjectarchitect
dc.subjectnasa
dc.subjectmsfc
dc.subjectspace
dc.subjectexploration
dc.subjectlunar
dc.subjectmoon
dc.subjectmars
dc.subjectmartian
dc.subjectcustom
dc.subjectdeep space
dc.subjectdeep space transport
dc.subjectcustom
dc.subjectouter space
dc.subjectspace
dc.subjectastronaut
dc.subjectarchitectural
dc.subjectmultifunctional
dc.subjectmultifunction
dc.subjectgravity
dc.subjectartificial gravity
dc.subjectpartial gravity
dc.subjectmicrogravity
dc.subjectfunctions
dc.subjectfunctional task analysis
dc.subjectadvanced
dc.subjectcatalogue
dc.subjectrequirements
dc.subjectsafe-haven
dc.subjectconfiguration
dc.subjectspacecraft
dc.subjectrocket
dc.subjectsurface habitat
dc.subjectassessments
dc.subjectengineering
dc.subjectarchitect
dc.titleViability of Common Habitat Areas for Partial Gravity and Microgravity
dc.date.updated2020-06-04T00:28:50Z
dc.type.genreThesis
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Science
thesis.degree.levelMasters
thesis.degree.disciplineMechanical Engineering
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Houston
thesis.degree.departmentMechanical Engineering, Department of
dc.contributor.committeeMemberSmitherman, David
dc.contributor.committeeMemberHoward, Robert
dc.contributor.committeeMemberBell, Larry S.
dc.creator.orcid0000-0002-7310-6127
local.embargo.terms2022-05-01
local.embargo.lift2022-05-01
dcterms.accessRightsThe full text of this item is not available at this time because the student has placed this item under an embargo for a period of time. The Libraries are not authorized to provide a copy of this work during the embargo period.
dc.type.dcmiText
dc.format.digitalOriginborn digital
dc.description.departmentMechanical Engineering, Department of
thesis.degree.collegeCullen College of Engineering


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