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dc.contributorJohnston, Craig A.
dc.contributor.authorHerron, Blake
dc.date.accessioned2019-01-03T17:49:37Z
dc.date.available2019-01-03T17:49:37Z
dc.date.issued2018
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10657/3884
dc.description.abstractBackground: Both food insecurity and obesity are disproportionately experienced by low-income, ethnic minority youth. However, the relationship between food insecurity and weight status is mixed. This study examined the relationship between food insecurity and weight status among high-risk youth. Methods: In Fall 2017, low-income, ethnic minority adolescents (n=197) were recruited from a Houston-area school. Students self-reported demographic information and free/reduced school meal participation was obtained from the school. Height and weight were measured and used to categorize weight status according to CDC guidelines. The nine-item USDA Child Food Security Survey Module assessed food insecurity. Descriptive statistics were computed, and a multivariate regression model was conducted in which weight classification was regressed onto food insecurity. Results: Participants were aged 14.96±1.82. The majority of participants were Hispanic (78%) and received free/reduced school meals (81%). Adolescents with food insecurity had 2.5 greater odds (95% CI: 1.21-5.31) of having overweight status than normal weight status. However, experiencing food insecurity did not predict obesity. Conclusions: These findings suggest that the relationship between food insecurity and weight status is not proportional. Longitudinal research is needed to help disentangle the relationship between food insecurity and weight status.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.titleFood insecurity and weight status among low income, ethnic minority adolescents
dc.typePoster
dc.description.departmentHonors College
dc.description.departmentHealth and Human Performance, Department of


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