Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorShih, Wei-Chuan
dc.creatorSung, Yulung
dc.date.accessioned2018-12-03T14:22:00Z
dc.date.available2018-12-03T14:22:00Z
dc.date.created2018-05
dc.date.issuedMay 2018
dc.date.submittedMay 2018
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10657/3587
dc.description.abstractSmartphones have become a ubiquitous form of personal computing that incorporate powerful imaging sensors, computational processing power, mobility, power, and networking in one portable package. By incorporating an add-on lens to a smartphone camera, microscopic imaging can be made possible. We introduce a lens-making technique by using the accelerated phase-change of inkjet-printed polydimethylsiloxane which enable fabrication of microscope lenses with precise focal length control. The lens can be self-adhered onto smartphone cameras and result in an imaging resolution of 1 µm, sufficient for biological cell imaging. The optical power of the lens can be finely controlled by varying printing variables including volume and temperature to obtain the desired magnification, and we demonstrate the mathematical modeling required to obtain the correct focal length, as well as the equipment setup and procedures to print and quality check lenses in large batches of hundreds at a time. The limitations with smartphone imaging largely stems from its small sensor with lower signal-to-noise ratios than comparable scientific cameras, therefore imaging techniques that improve microscopic imaging quality, particularly in low-light levels are introduced. This method ensures images on a smartphone have comparable quality with scientific cameras. Furthermore, by using a 3D printer to create simple attachments and holders with appropriate light sources, multimodal microscopy can be achieved. These attachments include using bright-field for direct microbiological observations and slide imaging, dark-field for scattering imaging such as fingerprinting on transparent surfaces, and fluorescence microscopy for molecular identification either through autofluorescence or immunofluorescence. The simple yet powerful functions of this mobile multimodal microscope enhances the potential of using smartphones as a platform for point-of-care testing.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen
dc.rightsThe author of this work is the copyright owner. UH Libraries and the Texas Digital Library have their permission to store and provide access to this work. Further transmission, reproduction, or presentation of this work is prohibited except with permission of the author(s).
dc.subjectSmartphone
dc.subjectMicroscopy
dc.subjectOptics
dc.subjectLensmaking
dc.subjectLenses
dc.subjectPDMS
dc.subjectImmunofluorescence
dc.subjectInkjet printing
dc.titleLens Fabrication by Accelerated Phase-Change for Mobile Multimodal Microscopic Imaging
dc.date.updated2018-12-03T14:22:00Z
dc.type.genreThesis
thesis.degree.nameDoctor of Philosophy
thesis.degree.levelDoctoral
thesis.degree.disciplineElectrical Engineering
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Houston
thesis.degree.departmentElectrical and Computer Engineering, Department of
dc.contributor.committeeMemberShan, Xiaonan
dc.contributor.committeeMemberWolfe, John C.
dc.contributor.committeeMemberYang, Ding-Shyue
dc.contributor.committeeMemberLin, Steven H.
dc.creator.orcid0000-0001-9232-0770
local.embargo.terms2020-05-01
local.embargo.lift2020-05-01
dcterms.accessRightsThe full text of this item is not available at this time because the student has placed this item under an embargo for a period of time. The Libraries are not authorized to provide a copy of this work during the embargo period.
dc.type.dcmiText
dc.format.digitalOriginborn digital
dc.description.departmentElectrical and Computer Engineering, Department of
thesis.degree.collegeCullen College of Engineering


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record